jeff@goldsteinlawyers.ca 647-838-6740

Fixed Term Contracts – Termination Clauses

Employers may wish to enter into fixed-term employment contracts for various reasons, most commonly where the employee is hired to complete a specific project or task for the employer with a defined deadline or where the employee has been hired during another employees leave of absence (i.e., maternity leave, sick leave, disability-related absence, etc.). When the full-time employee returns from leave, the services of employee that is working on a fixed-term contract will no longer be required.

Substantial litigation in Ontario has surrounded the early termination of fixed-term employment contracts. In other words, how much is the fixed-term employee owed if the employer opts to terminate their employment prior to the end of the expiry of the fixed term? In some cases, a clear and unambiguous termination clause will obligate the employer to only pay the amounts indicated in the clause (i.e., typically, 2 weeks of advanced notice of early termination or payment in lieu thereof); however, where these restrictive early termination clauses are ambiguous, they will be interpreted and construed in favour of the employee, in accordance with the principle of contract law referred to as contra preferentem.

As noted in Howard v. Benson 2015 ONSC 2638, in the absence of an enforceable (i.e., unambiguous) contractual provision, a fixed term employment contract obligates an employer to pay an employee to the end of the term and the obligation will not be subject to mitigation.  Where the language of a termination clause is unclear or can be interpreted in more than one way, the court should adopt the interpretation most favourable to the employee (Wood v. Fred Deeley Imports Ltd. 2017 ONCA 158).

Ambiguity can relate to any number of factors. In one case, our clients fixed term employment contract stipulated a minimum notice requirement but not a maximum. In other words, there was no language that clearly indicated that the 2 weeks notice represented all obligations of the employer to the employee on termination.In addition, it is a complete contradiction in terms to suggest that a contract is for one-year and then say it may be for just two weeks, at the whim of the employer. 

It is arguable that all fixed term contracts that purport to allow early termination for unspecified reasons ought, in principle, to be considered ambiguous, and interpreted contra proferentem.   However, there does not yet appear to be any jurisprudence which goes quite so far.  The point wasn’t raised in Benson, which looked instead for technical ambiguities in the wording of the termination clause itself.  It seems to me to be a contradiction in terms to state that you have a contract for a year, and then say that it might be a contract for just two weeks, at the whim of the employer.  

In any event, if you are an employee that has been terminated prior to the end of a fixed term contract, it is in your interest to have the severance package reviewed by an employment lawyer to determine whether the employer has provided you with your full entitlements based on the wording of your employment contract.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *